Examining the Nautilus T614

Nautilus! No, not the submarine or the aquatic animal, the exercise manufacturer, makers of Bowflex. They have a line of treadmills for residential use, and today, we’re taking a look at the T614.

By The Numbersnautilus t614 treadmill review

The T614 is the entry-level model in the Nautilus line, generally available from your average sports store.

There has a 2.75 CHP motor and is rated for a user weight of up to 300 pounds. The running belt is 1-ply and 1.5mm thick, with a workable running path of 55”x20”. For when you don’t need it, its SoftDrop (TM) folding design lets it collapse into something much less obtrusive.

For the user’s support, a strike zone (TM) Cushioning System ensures a smooth run. Run speed and incline capability can set from 0 to 12 MPH, as needed.

On top, the console serves the basic needs during a workout. The LCD screen in the center provides the usual statistics. A 3-speed fan is present and adjustable for user comfort.

To exercise your mind at the same time as your body, there’s a shelf for either a book or your tablet, accompanied by in-console speakers with a USB charging port and a 3.5mm audio jack.

The treadmill also offers its own workout programs, coming with twenty-two already built in, two of which are customizable, should the existing programs be insufficient.

To monitor heart rate, there are two ways: You can either take hold of the handlebars, which incorporate grips to read your heartbeat, or there’s the hands-free solution via a wireless chest strap, but be advised that the T614 does not include such a strap as is.

The included warranty is fairly usual, as Nautilus offers two years for mechanical and replacement parts and a year for labor. However, where other manufacturers generally provide lifetime warranties for the frame and drive, Nautilus only offers ten years.

Upsides

Since everything is a game of tradeoffs, the real questions are, what does the T614 do well, and where does it fall short?

First off, in addition to the folding design, it’s also wheeled. It’s easy enough to tuck into a corner when you’re not using it, though note that it doesn’t fold truly flat. Second, the included training programs offer a deal of variety.

Among the ones included are the manual, two customizable, three each of quick goal, weight control, and interval, plus five for train and heart health. With this much variety, it should be easy enough to find what works best for you, and if none of them work, there’s always the customizable programs.

The console itself provides for most of the ancillary features, what with the fan and audio system, plus the controls for incline, speed, program access. All are intuitive in terms of use. Lastly, the entire package comes just a tick below $1500, and thus it isn’t going to rip your wallet into a fine powder.

Downsides

So, in the tradeoffs game, what did we lose to get the above?

First, the warranty. In comparison to other warranties, the one on the T614 falls short. The two years on parts and the year on labor are on the low side of the usual, but other manufacturers offer lifetime warranties on frame and drive, as compared to the decade you get from Nautilus.

Now, ten years is long enough, but still.
Further, despite having the same capacity to work with a wireless chest strap to monitor heart rate, the same way as its more expensive brothers do, it notably does not include said chest strap.

The motor is also stingy on weight capacity, as 300 pounds is a bit low for something of its price and size. A motor of that caliber should support more weight, more along the lines of 350 to 400 pounds.

Final Thoughts

There’s much to recommend with the T614, and some downsides, as there always are. On the whole, the T614 is a serviceable enough treadmill for home use, and the customer on a budget will decently satisfied with it. For those who are willing to spend a bit more, its brothers down the line, the T616, and T618 may be more to your preference.